Thommy Ford Reads

A blog by the staff of the Thomas Ford Memorial Library

Which President Killed a Man?: Tantalizing Trivia and Fun Facts About Our Chief Executives and First Ladies by James Humes (973.09 HUM)

How well do you know our presidents? Think you are a history expert? If you just said “yes,” we have just the book for you – Which President Killed a Man? : Tantalizing Trivia and Fun Facts About Our Chief Executives and First Ladies by James Humes.

As you might guess, Which President Killed a Man? is an extensive collection of questions with answers grouped in thematic chapters. The author suggests readers could use it to play trivia games at parties or family get-togethers. That sounds like a nerdy thing to do, but I actually think it would be lots of fun. You have to have the right kinds of friends.

How many of these can you answer?

  • Which general was a winner when he faced four other generals in an election?
  • Who was the only president to be granted a patent for an invention?
  • Who was the only president to be elected to an office of the Confederacy?
  • Who was the first president to be born west of the Mississippi River?

James Garfield, Abraham Lincoln, John Tyler, and Herbert Hoover are your answers. Humes tells stories in revealing the answers to these and several hundred other questions. There are two or three questions per page. Much can be learned painlessly.

The author does not seem to have updated the work, but I think there are only a couple of answers that need revising. Check it out for you next party. – Review by Rick

One comment on “Which President Killed a Man?: Tantalizing Trivia and Fun Facts About Our Chief Executives and First Ladies by James Humes (973.09 HUM)

  1. Sky King Creative
    March 19, 2014

    I picked up this book at Barnes and Noble. Its a great bathroom reader because the facts are little snippets. Since the writer, James Humes, was a speech writer for 5 Republican presidents, I couldn’t help but notice that many of the facts for the Democratic presidents tended to be less flattering. He seems to really like pointed out all of the embarrassing facts about Bill Clinton in particular. Fair enough…

    Mr. Humes does offer many interesting facts about my favorite president Theodore Roosevelt. Probably because Roosevelt was, in my opinion, the most interesting and dynamic American public figure in the last 150 years.

    The author did make at least one factual mistake however. In the personal achievements section (p133) His quote on Teddy Roosevelt:

    “After he was president, Roosevelt went on a exploration trip down the Amazon River in Brazil. Later he went on Safari treks to Africa.”

    The author has the timing wrong. Roosevelt went only one Safari in Africa in 1909. That expedition was a great success. The Amazon expedition, commonly known as the ‘River of Doubt Expedition’ was in 1913/14 following his failed campaign at a 3rd presidential term.

    The Amazon expedition almost killed T.R. he suffered from a reoccurring bout of Malaria (Cuban Fever as he referred to it) compounded by an serious infection in his leg. Roosevelt was in a carriage accident early in his 1st term. The accident killed his ‘secret service body man’ and put T.R. in a wheel chair for several months.

    This an other facts can be found here on this great website on presidential trivia which is not associated with the author’s book.

    http://10presidentialfacts.com/theodore-roosevelt-trivia/

    http://10presidentialfacts.com

    Jim DiGiovanni

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This entry was posted on October 12, 2012 by in Book Review, History, Non-Fiction.
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